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Archive | Hospice of Dayton Events

Hospice of Dayton and Hospice of Butler & Warren Counties events that might be of interest to you, your family or someone else in our community. These events are for everyone, and not just for Hospice of Dayton patients or families. Feel free to share these opportunities to gather with others.

Remembrance Walk Honors Memories of Loved Ones and Benefits Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton

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Members of the community are invited to take part as individuals or as part of a team to honor the memory of a loved one at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton’s 3k/5k Remembrance Walk on Saturday, October 22, 2016.

The annual event involves the entire community in celebrating the lives of loved ones. Proceeds will enable Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton, a 501c(3) not-for-profit organization, to provide superior care and superior services to all patients with life-limiting illnesses, regardless of ability to pay. Programs supported by the Walk include:

Indigent Care – Hospice services are available to everyone in the greater Dayton community regardless of ability to pay.

Hospice House In-patient care options – In addition to serving patients in their homes, extended and assisted living facilities, Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton offers in-patient care at the Dayton Hospice House, providing intense care for patients experiencing medical situations or symptoms that cannot be managed in the home or facility setting.

Complementary, Focused & Palliative Care – Donor dollars enable patients to receive services such as highly specialized disease-specific treatment for hospice patients, and palliative care for patients with significant pain and symptom control issues. Massage, art, music and occupational therapies are also provided to assure an improved quality of life for patients.

Community wide Grief Support Services – We provide Grief Support Services at no cost, regardless of whether our hospice services have been used

Contact: Marsha Bernard, Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton Foundation, 937-258-5537, or email mbernard@hospiceofdayton.org or register here.

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Stories Resonate When We Need Them Most

“In times of difficulty, we tell the stories again. If there’s a crisis, we tell the stories. It’s a human need; it strengthens our souls.”

So begins a nuanced discussion about listening and sharing – for patient and care giver – by a leading authority on developing simple but crucial tools that enable coping and meaning in end-of-life scenarios.

Dr. Rachel Naomi Remen, clinical professor of family and community medicine at the University of California San Francisco and clinical professor at Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, recently conducted a daylong seminar for hospice professionals at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton.

Participants in “Reclaiming Awe: A workshop on Mystery, Meaning and Resilience for Hospice Professionals” were reminded of the wonder and lessons to be learned working with people on the edge of life. “The whole purpose of the workshop was to bring more meaning to your work,” said Angelene Volpatti, an occupational therapist who works with hospice patients in their homes. “I learned practical tools,” Volpatti said, such as breath awareness. “If you don’t have meaning in your work you will burn out,” she said.

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After the workshop, Dr. Remen, a pioneer of the Relationship Centered Care and Integrative Medicine, discussed her journey of restoring medicine as a calling and work of healing. A student in the 1960s of the human potential movement at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, Ca., Dr. Remen delved into transpersonal and humanistic psychology. She said she was “taken” with the idea that value, integrity and meaning could be infused into dire and chronic diagnoses.

“When I finished with training I wanted to work with patients like myself” (she was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease 63 years ago) living with chronic illness, she said. “Even if you couldn’t fix the disease you could have a meaningful life.” She sought patients who could not find relief from conventional medicine. “I went to the medical community and asked for the patients who were taking up all their time. The first (doctor) said, ‘There is nothing I can do with them. If you want to take them off my hands, you can see all my patients.’ I had a full practice in a month and a half. They, as medical people, had nothing to offer them.” Dr. Remen said she began what she calls ‘generous listening.’ “I discovered what an important thing it is to be a human being. I found what it is to find meaning, wisdom and love. I discovered how much better they were living than their doctors.”

Then, the mysterious and deadly disease AIDS struck.

“It was like a war zone. People were afraid to touch. We didn’t know what we were dealing with. The half-life of a hospice nurse was about six weeks,” Dr. Remen said. “You would come to work on Monday and you and your team were assigned seven patients – the most creative people – and by Friday they were dead. When you came in Monday, you had another seven. People couldn’t do it.”
Dr. Remen was asked to help the people who were helping the AIDS population. “I didn’t know how to do that, but I was interested, and did some research.”

The night before a presentation, she had a dream.

“It was a group, facing outward toward San Francisco, the battle zone, sending waves of strength,” she said. “In the middle was a black hole, and if you stepped back, you’d fall into the hole.” Dr. Remen felt the group needed to “turn around and take care of each other. We were each so alone with this epidemic. If we turned around, as a community, we could do this together.” What she discovered, she said, is that the strength “is in the stories, the learning that was going on among us. So, on Friday, when everyone had died, we spent a few hours sharing the pieces of those lives, finding who each other was, and was important. The turnover stopped.”

“When we live at the edge of things – such places as hospice, war, medical epidemics – that’s where we learn what really matters.”
Dr. Remen said today’s corporate concerns about the bottom line and cost containment can inhibit these important caregiver practices.
Dr. Remen said it is an “interesting time in medicine.” She noted how high numbers of physicians are “depressed, drug-addicted, committing suicide. This has been a challenge, to look at medical education. Why are doctors so vulnerable and suffering compassion overload? We must be able to live the meaning of your work – to see meaning like you see color – and ask what is evoked by this disease? What does this tell us about the patient?”

She said one can feel “grateful to be with those people, you can be strengthened and fed. When people experience their work as having individualized meaning, that you can make a difference, there is low incidence of burnout.” Dr. Remen believes “becoming present, being able to live ‘in the neighborhood of yourself’ but seeing what is in front of yourself, is not about doing anything different, but seeing things in new ways.”

Social worker Michael Kammer, who works at the Hospice House in Dayton, said Dr. Remen’s workshop gave him “a refreshing sense of mission, and was a reminder of why I’m doing this.”

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Mother’s Day Tea Offers Grief Support

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This Mother’s Day, the grief support program of Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton is offering special support to those who have lost their mothers.

Pathways of Hope at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton invites members of the public who have lost their mother to attend a Mother’s Day Tea on Wednesday, May 4 to honor memories of mom. The program will be held from 12 noon to 2 pm in the Community Room at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton. According to Bereavement Counselor Debbie Holt, MS, PCC-S, “The Mother’s Day Tea is designed as an event to remember and honor moms who have been lost in the last year.

For many, Mother’s Day can be a painful holiday for those who have lost mothers, even for those who have been handling their grief well. While a single event can’t heal the pain, the Tea will provide opportunities to share with others who are experiencing the same loss and will provide helpful information on how to cope with the grief the holiday brings.
Honoring will come through the sharing of memories and what mom meant to each individual. It won’t be necessary to speak the memories if the attendee chooses not to, but setting aside time to reflect on those memories can be very helpful amidst the busyness of day to day life.”

Holt predicts there will not only be tears, but laughter at the Mother’s Day Tea. Attendees will be invited to take home their teacup as a remembrance of mom and the event. Advance reservations are required. Those interested in attending can contact Pathways of Hope at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton at 937-258-4991.

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Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton Spearheads Matters of the Heart Series with Local Clergy


Serious illness and end-of-life needs are unique.  “Matters of the Heart” is designed to empower clergy and lay leaders to support their communities.

Faith communities are called upon to support members of their congregations during times of serious illness and loss. Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton is reaching out to faith communities to strengthen and educate clergy and lay leaders in serving their constituencies. The next session in the series is slated for March 23 at the Ray and Joan Kroc Community Center, 1000 N. Keowee Street in Dayton. The focus of the session is Addressing Caregiver Burnout: Yours and Those Who Are Caregivers for Loved Ones. There is no cost for the program.

Kim Vesey, RN, CHPN, MS, Vice President of Mission Support with Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton, is leading the Matters of the Heart project, working with faith communities from across the Miami Valley. “By using our expertise to better prepare congregations in supporting their families, we believe we are extending our mission of reducing pain and suffering,” Vesey explains.

The Matters of the Heart Series involves members of church communities who develop individualized approaches to addressing the needs of those dying and grieving within their faith community. Each faith community develops and individualizes approaches to address the needs identified among their following.

Additional information is available by contacting Kim Vesey at kvesey@hospiceofdayton.org or by calling (937) 256-9507, ext. 4447. Advance registration is required and can be completed at https://hospiceofdayton.webconnex.com/clergy.

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2015 Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon

Each year, volunteers give their time, skills, and compassionate service supporting the mission of Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton and Hospice of Butler & Warren Counties. This time of year, the staff of both locations gets to say Thank You to the volunteers who help make providing superior care and superior services to our patients and their families possible!

We would like to add a special note of thanks to the wonderful members of the Epsilon Lambda Sorority. For the past 15 years, these talented and dedicated volunteers have created and sold hundreds of batches of homemade caramels as a fundraiser for Hospice of Dayton Foundation. This year, the group planned to turn out 350 pounds of delicious homemade caramels, with outstanding success! A check for over $2,000 was presented to the Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton Foundation today from sales. Amazing!

Thank you, Epsilon Lambda Sorority Sisters, and Thank You to all our incredible volunteers!

 

Ohio’s Hospice Spearheads Unbroken Circle of Care with Local Clergy

Faith communities are called upon to support members of their congregations during times of serious illness and loss. Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton is reaching out to faith communities to strengthen and educate clergy and laity in serving this constituency.

Kim Vesey, RN, CHPN, MS, Vice President of Mission Support with Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton, is leading the Unbroken Circle of Care project, working with faith communities from across the Miami Valley. “By using our expertise to better prepare congregations in supporting their families, we believe we are extending our mission of reducing pain and suffering,” Vesey explains.

clergy, Dayton, grief, counseling, training, hospice Vesey is leading a series of programs that involve members of church communities who develop individualized approaches to addressing the needs of those dying and grieving within their faith community. For some places of worship, specific ceremonies are developed to celebrate and honor the lives of the dying; for others, the development of resources to support caregivers may take priority. For all, it is an expression of compassion and caring for those within the community at a time when it is needed most.

Outrageous 2 Reinvent You: 2015 Hospice of Dayton HairShow a Success!

The Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton 2015 HairShow inspired attendees and participating salons alike to honor Dayton’s roots! Its theme, “Outrageous 2 Reinvent You!” brought out the creative and innovative spirit of Dayton by challenging salons to interpret the concept of reinvention. Thank you to all the sponsors, hair salons, and attendees for making the mission of community nonprofit hospice care a reality in Dayton!

(Photos credit: Carly Short Photography.)

Veterans Memorial Dedication Slated at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton for Veterans Day

APMemorial-Campbell2Dignitaries and local military leaders are among those invited to attend as Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton celebrates the dedication of a new Veteran’s memorial on the campus on Wednesday, November 11. The memorial honors the service and celebrates the lives of veterans from the Miami Valley community.

The American Pride Veterans Memorial is located on the north side of the Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton’s building at 324 Wilmington Avenue in Dayton.

The memorial has multiple illustrated panels dedicated to individual military involvements – the Revolutionary War, Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korean, Viet Nam, Desert Storm and the War Against Terror. Each branch of the service is also represented with a panel of its own. The floor of the memorial is a map of the world, reflecting the international scope of conflict.

Each branch of the United States service is represented with a flag, along with the state flag as part of the memorial. The American flag will fly proudly in the center.

The memorial was designed and constructed by Paul J. Striebel and Associates architects of Centerville.

The American Pride Veterans Memorial is a part of Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton program to honor the Veterans and families they have the honor and privilege of serving throughout the greater Dayton area.

The memorial features an interactive kiosk that offers an opportunity for all Veterans in the Miami Valley to be remembered. This kiosk will sit on the south side of the memorial and feature the names, photos and short stories about area Veterans. Future plans for the kiosk include remote viewing of the memorial listings and a feature that allows local family members to add Veterans to the kiosk.

Ceremonies to dedicate the new memorial are scheduled for 5 pm on Veterans Day. The public is invited to attend. 

RSVP for this event here: Veterans Memorial Dedication

Education Series Helps Caregivers of those with Alzheimer’s Disease

Dr. BharwaniMany families try to deal with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia care challenges while keeping loved ones at home.  Wright State University, Hospice of Dayton and the Greater Dayton Mental Health Foundation are teaming up to offer a series of educational programs focused on practical techniques for home caregivers to improve quality of care for people with dementia, as well as reduce the stress on caregivers.  The program is tailored to the needs of caregivers and there is no cost and no clinical credit attached.

The series offers monthly presentations led by Dr. Govind Bharwani, Co-Director of Ergonomics and Alzheimer’s Care at Wright State University (WSU) in Dayton, OH.  Dr. Bharwani earned his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from WSU and has consulted for more than 100 organizations in the application of ergonomics and Alzheimer’s care.  Dr. Bharwani has effectively applied the science of ergonomics and neuroscience research to improve the quality of life for people with Alzheimer’s in long-term care facilities across the nation.  His innovative program called Behavior-Based Ergonomics Therapy (BBET) has received six national awards.  Dr. Bharwani received the 2012 Leaders of Tomorrow Award from Long-Term Living magazine and the 2014 Public Service Award from the American College of Health Care Administrators (ACHCA).

Each session addresses specific topics related to Alzheimer’s disease.  For the schedule of presentations click here.

Registration Information

Advance registration is required for each individual session.

Registration is available by calling 937-256-9507, ext. 2237 or by visiting the website www.hospiceofdayton.org/Alzheimers.

Now registering for PATHWAYS BREAKAWAY

CLICK HERE to register.

Pathways Breakaway is a daylong, grief focused event designed for children, 7-17, who have experienced the death of a parent or other loved one. Experiencing the event in age specific groups,participants will enjoy fun activities such as swimming, ice skatingand games as well as grief activities involving art, music anddiscussion groups. Lunch and snacks will be provided.Pathways Breakaway will be held on Monday, January 19, 2015, a day on which most children will be out of school for the MartinLuther King holiday. The event, which will be held at the Kettering Recreation Center, 2900 Glengarry Drive, Kettering, Ohio, will beginat 8:00 a.m. and end at 5:30 p.m. Breakaway is offered at no charge, but pre-registration is required as the event will be limited to 50 children. For further information and registration materials,please contact Pathways of Hope at (937)258-4991, or emailpathwaysofhope@hospiceofdayon.org, or register online at www.hospiceofdayton.org/breakaway.