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Hospice of Dayton and Hospice of Butler & Warren Counties events that might be of interest to you, your family or someone else in our community. These events are for everyone, and not just for patients or families. Feel free to share these opportunities to gather with others.

Ohio’s Hospice of Butler & Warren Counties Offers Holiday Grief Support Program


Hope for the Holidays Supports Those Grieving

The holiday season is a time of great emotion.  For those who are experiencing their first holiday following the loss of a loved one, the emotions of the holiday season can be overwhelming.  Pathways of Hope at Ohio’s Hospice of Butler & Warren Counties offers “Hope for the Holidays” to help.

Open to any member of the community who has lost a loved one, “Hope for the Holidays” is a presentation by the bereavement counseling staff that will celebrate and honor lost loved ones and offer insight into ways to cope with grief during the emotionally charged holiday season. Light refreshments will be served and participants will receive a keepsake ornament. The program is free of charge thanks to the generosity of the community. Due to limited seating, reservations are required. When making your reservation please indicate the number attending, as well as the name of the loved one you would like to honor.

“Hope for the Holiday” will be held:

Thursday, November 30 from 7-8 pm

at the Ohio’s Hospice of Butler & Warren Counties Team and Staff Center

5940 Long Meadow Dr., Franklin, Ohio

Please RSVP by November 22 to 937.258.4991.

 

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Register Now for August Volunteer Training

Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton will hold a new volunteer orientation on August 19, 2017.

Hospice volunteers play a vital role with the interdisciplinary teams serving hospice patients and their families. Maureen Swarts, Volunteer Services Manager, welcomes volunteers from all backgrounds and of all ages.  “Volunteers give from their hearts and enable us to touch the lives of patients and families with enhanced compassion and care. They are essential to our mission of providing superior care and superior services.”

Hospice volunteers provide a variety of support and services including respite care, shopping, delivery of medications and supplies, massage, beautician and barber services and gardening.  Volunteers also serve as ambassadors sharing information about hospice care, as friendly visitors and in office support roles. Volunteer training acquaints new volunteers with information on

  • History and goals of end-of-life care
  • Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton history
  • Role of Volunteers and opportunities
  • Confidentiality, infection control, and safety
  • Boundaries
  • Effective listening
  • Loss and grief

For additional information please visit www.hospiceofdayton.org/volunteers/

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Thank You for Supporting Steins, Stems, Savories & Sweets!

Thank you to all who joined us for Steins, Stems, Savories & Sweets! Support from sponsors, donors, vendors and those in attendance enable us to deliver superior care and superior services to every family and maintain a singular focus on quality of life.

Thanks to all who helped to make this event possible!

Couldn’t make it? You can still support our mission by clicking here.

See highlights from the event below!

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We offer our sincerest thanks to the following groups and individuals that made Steins, Stems, Savories & Sweets possible:

Sponsors

Presenting Sponsor:

Champagne Sponsor:

Friend of Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton

 

Midas Sponsors:

Jerry & Patty Tatar

 

Reserve Sponsors:

Kent & Teri Anderson

Coolidge Wall Co., L.P.A.

McGohan Brabender – Tony Lombardo

Today’s Home Interiors

 

Premium Sponsors:

Jan Culver & Gene Kurtz

Designworks Studio

Elizabeth Diamond Company

Hanson Audio Video LLC

Mr. & Mrs. Franz J. Hoge

NOVUM Custom Homes

Therapy Support

USI Insurance Services

 

Patron Sponsors:

Keith Bowers

Frank & Pam Howard

John Jessup

Tom & Lois Mann

MFS Investment Services

Chip & Betsy Mues

Dr. Syl Trepanier &

Mr. Jeffrey Nugent

 

Supporting Sponsors:

Dr. & Mrs. Ratna Palakodeti

John A. Rossi Photography

Transamerica

 

Steins, Stems, Savories & Sweets

Steins:

Fifth Street Brewpub

Warped Wing Brewing Co.

Carillon Brewing Co.

 

Stems:

Rumbleseat Wine

 

Savories:

Archer’s Tavern

Bar Dumaine – Rue Dumaine

Coco’s Bistro

El Meson

Greek Street Food Truck

Lily’s Bistro

Nibbles – Watermark

Salar

 

Sweets:

Esther Price

Ginniebug Creations

 

Committee Members

Teri Anderson – Chair

Mary Bane

Jan Culver

Claudia Dickey

Donna Durst

Connie Foster

Chris Holloway

Lori Igel

Mary Irby-Jones

Anne Kearney

Laura Koons

Ryan Leesman

Susan Page

Lezley Pisone

Ashley Robison

Susan Ruff

Craig Schrolucke

Toni Sprinkle

Tammy Thomas

Friends

Archer’s Tavern

Brooklyn Brewery

Dayton History-Carillon Park

Carillon Brewing Co.

Cathy Pearson

Coco’s Bistro

Dayton Performing Arts Alliance

Dorothy Lane Market

El Meson

Elements Massage-Beavercreek

Elizabeth Diamond Company

Enduring Youth Skin & Laser Center

Eric Matthew, Guitarist

Esther Price Candies

Fifth Street Brewpub

Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar

Connie Foster, Designworks Studio

Gervasi Vineyard

Ginniebug Creations

Greek Street Food Truck

Hanson Audio Video LLC

The Human Race Theatre Company

Lily’s Bistro

Leone Hinzman

Kathy Anderson, Owner, My Pilates Studio

Nestlé

Nibbles Restaurant & Catering – Watermark

Nicholas Yust

Peter Benjamin & Kate Callahan

The Pine Club

Poelking Lanes South

Rue Dumaine – Bar Dumaine

Rumbleseat Wine

Salar

Springhouse Architects

Stephanie Llacuna, Harpist

Sysco

The Woodhouse Day Spa

Today’s Home Interiors

Victoria Theatre Association

Warped Wing Brewing Co.

Watson’s of Dayton

Wellington Grille

Winans Chocolates & Coffees

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Help Our Mission – Become a Volunteer in 2017!

Volunteer helps with office tasks.

Help us enhance the quality of life of patients and families – #volunteer with us! The first volunteer orientation of the year is January 21.

At orientation, you will learn:

  • History and goals of end-of-life care
  • Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton history
  • Role of Volunteers and opportunities
  • Confidentiality, infection control, and safety
  • Boundaries
  • Effective listening
  • Loss and grief

Volunteer orientation dates throughout the year are:

January 21

February 13

March 1 & 25

April 12

May 10

June 7 & 17

July 12

August 19

September 18

October 11 & 14

November 8

December 6

All sessions are from 8:30 am – 2:30 pm.

If you are interested, please complete the volunteer application and learn more here.

Please call 937.256.9507, ext. 3314 for more information.

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Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton Joins In Honoring Veterans

comm-care-vet-pinHospice of Dayton, Hospice of Miami County and Community Care Hospice – all affiliates of Ohio’s Hospice – joined together to honor Clinton County Veterans participating in a recent Honor Flight visit to Washington D.C. Almost 80 Veterans and their guardians took part in the Honor Flight experience, which included a tribute and send off at the Clinton County Courthouse.

The flight was sponsored by the Rotary Club of Wilmington, which raised money to send the Veterans and their guardians on the Honor Flight trip to see war memorials in the nation’s capitol. The community-based hospice organizations recognized participating Veterans with an American Pride pinning ceremony prior to their departure, making sure that each Veteran received an American Pride pin and was thanked for his/her service. The effort was a community extension of the American Pride program of each of the hospices. American Pride assures that Veterans in hospice care receive benefits and support that acknowledge their services and sacrifice. By recognizing the unique needs of our nation’s Veterans who are facing a life-limiting illnesses, these local not-for-profit hospice providers are able to accompany and guide Veterans and their families towards a more peaceful ending.

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Remembrance Walk Honors Memories of Loved Ones and Benefits Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton

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Members of the community are invited to take part as individuals or as part of a team to honor the memory of a loved one at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton’s 3k/5k Remembrance Walk on Saturday, October 22, 2016.

The annual event involves the entire community in celebrating the lives of loved ones. Proceeds will enable Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton, a 501c(3) not-for-profit organization, to provide superior care and superior services to all patients with life-limiting illnesses, regardless of ability to pay. Programs supported by the Walk include:

Indigent Care – Hospice services are available to everyone in the greater Dayton community regardless of ability to pay.

Hospice House In-patient care options – In addition to serving patients in their homes, extended and assisted living facilities, Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton offers in-patient care at the Dayton Hospice House, providing intense care for patients experiencing medical situations or symptoms that cannot be managed in the home or facility setting.

Complementary, Focused & Palliative Care – Donor dollars enable patients to receive services such as highly specialized disease-specific treatment for hospice patients, and palliative care for patients with significant pain and symptom control issues. Massage, art, music and occupational therapies are also provided to assure an improved quality of life for patients.

Community wide Grief Support Services – We provide Grief Support Services at no cost, regardless of whether our hospice services have been used

Contact: Marsha Bernard, Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton Foundation, 937-258-5537, or email mbernard@hospiceofdayton.org or register here.

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Stories Resonate When We Need Them Most

“In times of difficulty, we tell the stories again. If there’s a crisis, we tell the stories. It’s a human need; it strengthens our souls.”

So begins a nuanced discussion about listening and sharing – for patient and care giver – by a leading authority on developing simple but crucial tools that enable coping and meaning in end-of-life scenarios.

Dr. Rachel Naomi Remen, clinical professor of family and community medicine at the University of California San Francisco and clinical professor at Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, recently conducted a daylong seminar for hospice professionals at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton.

Participants in “Reclaiming Awe: A workshop on Mystery, Meaning and Resilience for Hospice Professionals” were reminded of the wonder and lessons to be learned working with people on the edge of life. “The whole purpose of the workshop was to bring more meaning to your work,” said Angelene Volpatti, an occupational therapist who works with hospice patients in their homes. “I learned practical tools,” Volpatti said, such as breath awareness. “If you don’t have meaning in your work you will burn out,” she said.

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After the workshop, Dr. Remen, a pioneer of the Relationship Centered Care and Integrative Medicine, discussed her journey of restoring medicine as a calling and work of healing. A student in the 1960s of the human potential movement at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, Ca., Dr. Remen delved into transpersonal and humanistic psychology. She said she was “taken” with the idea that value, integrity and meaning could be infused into dire and chronic diagnoses.

“When I finished with training I wanted to work with patients like myself” (she was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease 63 years ago) living with chronic illness, she said. “Even if you couldn’t fix the disease you could have a meaningful life.” She sought patients who could not find relief from conventional medicine. “I went to the medical community and asked for the patients who were taking up all their time. The first (doctor) said, ‘There is nothing I can do with them. If you want to take them off my hands, you can see all my patients.’ I had a full practice in a month and a half. They, as medical people, had nothing to offer them.” Dr. Remen said she began what she calls ‘generous listening.’ “I discovered what an important thing it is to be a human being. I found what it is to find meaning, wisdom and love. I discovered how much better they were living than their doctors.”

Then, the mysterious and deadly disease AIDS struck.

“It was like a war zone. People were afraid to touch. We didn’t know what we were dealing with. The half-life of a hospice nurse was about six weeks,” Dr. Remen said. “You would come to work on Monday and you and your team were assigned seven patients – the most creative people – and by Friday they were dead. When you came in Monday, you had another seven. People couldn’t do it.”
Dr. Remen was asked to help the people who were helping the AIDS population. “I didn’t know how to do that, but I was interested, and did some research.”

The night before a presentation, she had a dream.

“It was a group, facing outward toward San Francisco, the battle zone, sending waves of strength,” she said. “In the middle was a black hole, and if you stepped back, you’d fall into the hole.” Dr. Remen felt the group needed to “turn around and take care of each other. We were each so alone with this epidemic. If we turned around, as a community, we could do this together.” What she discovered, she said, is that the strength “is in the stories, the learning that was going on among us. So, on Friday, when everyone had died, we spent a few hours sharing the pieces of those lives, finding who each other was, and was important. The turnover stopped.”

“When we live at the edge of things – such places as hospice, war, medical epidemics – that’s where we learn what really matters.”
Dr. Remen said today’s corporate concerns about the bottom line and cost containment can inhibit these important caregiver practices.
Dr. Remen said it is an “interesting time in medicine.” She noted how high numbers of physicians are “depressed, drug-addicted, committing suicide. This has been a challenge, to look at medical education. Why are doctors so vulnerable and suffering compassion overload? We must be able to live the meaning of your work – to see meaning like you see color – and ask what is evoked by this disease? What does this tell us about the patient?”

She said one can feel “grateful to be with those people, you can be strengthened and fed. When people experience their work as having individualized meaning, that you can make a difference, there is low incidence of burnout.” Dr. Remen believes “becoming present, being able to live ‘in the neighborhood of yourself’ but seeing what is in front of yourself, is not about doing anything different, but seeing things in new ways.”

Social worker Michael Kammer, who works at the Hospice House in Dayton, said Dr. Remen’s workshop gave him “a refreshing sense of mission, and was a reminder of why I’m doing this.”

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Staff Honored for Years of Service

Our staff provides superior care and services for our patients and families we serve daily – we think it’s worth celebrating, especially those who have contributed years of service to our mission.

Staff from Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton were honored for their years of contributions at the Ohio’s Hospice Staff Recognition Breakfast on Thursday, June 23.

The following were recognized:

5 Years

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(Listed alphabetically) Janet Allen, Doug Arnett, Lisa Balster, Lisa Bateman, Ciara Bayne, Kathy Berthy, Jennifer Bloom Long, Paula Booth, Michelle Bowman, Tina Brewer, Gretchen Buchanan, Marlene Cobb, Laurie Combs, Nancy Conatser, Linda Cummins, Mark Curtis, Dana Datz, Dominic DeAloia, Jessica Dutton, Lynn Edwards, John Eshelman, Robin Ferguson, Diane Foreman, Linda Gault, Lorraine Gilkison, Carl Gill, Susan Good, Tiffany Harris, Kate Hawvermale, Will Henry, Jennifer Hrovat, Robert Huden, Suzanne Jackson, Shea Johnson, Tiffanie Johnson, Brenda Jones, Catina Lamb, Christina Lawrence, Jenny Liew, Stacey Lykins, Rebekah Marlow, Jacy McCain, Amanda McCoy, Donna Molton, Birdie Napper, Susan Page, Adriana Palamariu, Letitia Person, Ashley Puchalski, Lisa Rhoden, Faith Richardson, Tim Robinson, Anna Rymer, DeShay Scandrick, Patricia Scheper, Carrie Schroder, Nancy Silverman, Gayle Simmons, Sandra Simpson, Jaime Sowers, Lesa Stewart, Theresa Sugrue, Bob Tangeman, Brittany Thiel, Melinda Tobin, Angelene Volpatti, Kevin Wardlaw, Stephen Wetterhan, Megan Wissinger and Miriam Wolf

10 Years

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(Listed alphabetically) Jamie Doughman, Vickie Hartke, Lisa Hayslip, Debbie Holt, Janet Koehl, Amy LeVan, Connie Pappas, Craig Thacker,  Michael Toerner, Kashauna White, and JoAnne Wynn.

15 Years

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(Listed alphabetically) Heather Bolton, Janet Dickens, Gloria Entela, Susan Freeman, Marianne Montjoy and Dr. Ruth Thomson

20 Years

Donna Braun-Slyman

Quarter Century Club

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Dena Wenzler

With gratitude, we thank our staff for all they do at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton!

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Mother’s Day Tea Offers Grief Support

May Tea Event-01
This Mother’s Day, the grief support program of Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton is offering special support to those who have lost their mothers.

Pathways of Hope at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton invites members of the public who have lost their mother to attend a Mother’s Day Tea on Wednesday, May 4 to honor memories of mom. The program will be held from 12 noon to 2 pm in the Community Room at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton. According to Bereavement Counselor Debbie Holt, MS, PCC-S, “The Mother’s Day Tea is designed as an event to remember and honor moms who have been lost in the last year.

For many, Mother’s Day can be a painful holiday for those who have lost mothers, even for those who have been handling their grief well. While a single event can’t heal the pain, the Tea will provide opportunities to share with others who are experiencing the same loss and will provide helpful information on how to cope with the grief the holiday brings.
Honoring will come through the sharing of memories and what mom meant to each individual. It won’t be necessary to speak the memories if the attendee chooses not to, but setting aside time to reflect on those memories can be very helpful amidst the busyness of day to day life.”

Holt predicts there will not only be tears, but laughter at the Mother’s Day Tea. Attendees will be invited to take home their teacup as a remembrance of mom and the event. Advance reservations are required. Those interested in attending can contact Pathways of Hope at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton at 937-258-4991.

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Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton Spearheads Matters of the Heart Series with Local Clergy


Serious illness and end-of-life needs are unique.  “Matters of the Heart” is designed to empower clergy and lay leaders to support their communities.

Faith communities are called upon to support members of their congregations during times of serious illness and loss. Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton is reaching out to faith communities to strengthen and educate clergy and lay leaders in serving their constituencies. The next session in the series is slated for March 23 at the Ray and Joan Kroc Community Center, 1000 N. Keowee Street in Dayton. The focus of the session is Addressing Caregiver Burnout: Yours and Those Who Are Caregivers for Loved Ones. There is no cost for the program.

Kim Vesey, RN, CHPN, MS, Vice President of Mission Support with Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton, is leading the Matters of the Heart project, working with faith communities from across the Miami Valley. “By using our expertise to better prepare congregations in supporting their families, we believe we are extending our mission of reducing pain and suffering,” Vesey explains.

The Matters of the Heart Series involves members of church communities who develop individualized approaches to addressing the needs of those dying and grieving within their faith community. Each faith community develops and individualizes approaches to address the needs identified among their following.

Additional information is available by contacting Kim Vesey at kvesey@hospiceofdayton.org or by calling (937) 256-9507, ext. 4447. Advance registration is required and can be completed at https://hospiceofdayton.webconnex.com/clergy.

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