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Top Stories of 2017

This year brought many moments and stories worth celebrating. We were honored to share these moments with you. As we reflected on 2017, we wondered what stories had the most impact on you. Here are the top 5!

#5: Celebrating Staff Milestones

You celebrated with us by reading about our staff members who celebrated 5-25 years of service at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton! Find a refresher about how we honored them here.


 

#4: A Birthday Celebration that Impacted Hundreds

The young Karlee Plozay honored her great-grandfather by gathering some of her close pals for her birthday. Together they painted enough memory flower pots to brighten almost 1,000 lives. Get the full story here.


#3: The Original Dayton Hospice History

2018 will mark 40 years of Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton serving the Greater Dayton community – 40 years of rich history that many of you were inspired to learn about. Here’s our full story.


 

#2: The Start of a New Partnership

When we announced the launch of Pure Healthcare, many of you were curious what this new facility will do for you and your loved ones. This new facility is of a kind in not only Dayton but across the U.S. Find the announcement here.


 

#1: There Was No Book

A son opened up about his care journey for his mother. His story moved our followers on social media. He shares his story here.

 


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Mary’s Party of a Lifetime

We are all familiar with birthdays, anniversaries, and family reunions as ways to gather together and #CelebrateLifesStories – but what if you sent out invites to your closest friends and family to celebrate your life and attend your own wake? “A-wake,” that is.

Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton patient Mary Lou Spangler’s wish was to have a celebration of her life with loved ones, and her dream came true. With the help of family and the hospice staff, Mary had the time of her life embracing old friends and new grandchildren at her party “Mary Lou’s Big A-Wake.”

Long time friends of 50 years celebrate Mary's life at her big a-wake.

Mary Lou Spangler, left, with best friend of over 50 years Darlynn.

“When I got sicker a few months ago, it got me thinking about the changes (in my condition),” Mary said. “In the back of my mind, I knew that this (celebration) was what I wanted. I didn’t like the idea of anyone partying without me!”

Mary shows off her customized wine glass for her special day, Big A-Wake

Mary shows off her customized wine glass for her special day.

While sipping out of her personalized wine glass, Mary was the star of the show and looked stunning while wearing a nametag that read “The Queen.”  With all the selfies she was getting, you would think she was a celebrity. She was that day.

Mary gets a selfie with her partner Charlie at her Big A-Wake.

Mary gets a selfie with her partner Charlie.

“I’ve always been a party girl,” Mary said with a grin. “It makes me laugh and it makes me cry to be with everyone today.”

Mary’s son, Ted Spangler, who according to his nametag is “Mom’s Favorite,” shared his joy with many at his mother’s party and talked about the difference Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton has made in their lives.

“Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton is everything,” Ted said. “They have gone above and beyond. This party would never work without their support.”

Ted’s brother Dean Spangler chimed in.

“Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton extended (Mary’s) life immensely,” he said. “I can’t say enough about it. It’s been a great experience. Everyone that’s taken care of her has been wonderful.”

Mary and friends enjoy looking at a slideshow of her favorite memories at her Big A-Wake.

Mary and friends enjoy looking at a slideshow of her favorite memories.

Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton is grateful for the honor and privilege of celebrating life with Mary and her loved ones. We are so glad the party was a hit!

How can we help your loved one celebrate life? Learn more about our services by clicking here or calling 937.256.4490.

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Thank You for Supporting Steins, Stems, Savories & Sweets!

Thank you to all who joined us for Steins, Stems, Savories & Sweets! Support from sponsors, donors, vendors and those in attendance enable us to deliver superior care and superior services to every family and maintain a singular focus on quality of life.

Thanks to all who helped to make this event possible!

Couldn’t make it? You can still support our mission by clicking here.

See highlights from the event below!

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We offer our sincerest thanks to the following groups and individuals that made Steins, Stems, Savories & Sweets possible:

Sponsors

Presenting Sponsor:

Champagne Sponsor:

Friend of Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton

 

Midas Sponsors:

Jerry & Patty Tatar

 

Reserve Sponsors:

Kent & Teri Anderson

Coolidge Wall Co., L.P.A.

McGohan Brabender – Tony Lombardo

Today’s Home Interiors

 

Premium Sponsors:

Jan Culver & Gene Kurtz

Designworks Studio

Elizabeth Diamond Company

Hanson Audio Video LLC

Mr. & Mrs. Franz J. Hoge

NOVUM Custom Homes

Therapy Support

USI Insurance Services

 

Patron Sponsors:

Keith Bowers

Frank & Pam Howard

John Jessup

Tom & Lois Mann

MFS Investment Services

Chip & Betsy Mues

Dr. Syl Trepanier &

Mr. Jeffrey Nugent

 

Supporting Sponsors:

Dr. & Mrs. Ratna Palakodeti

John A. Rossi Photography

Transamerica

 

Steins, Stems, Savories & Sweets

Steins:

Fifth Street Brewpub

Warped Wing Brewing Co.

Carillon Brewing Co.

 

Stems:

Rumbleseat Wine

 

Savories:

Archer’s Tavern

Bar Dumaine – Rue Dumaine

Coco’s Bistro

El Meson

Greek Street Food Truck

Lily’s Bistro

Nibbles – Watermark

Salar

 

Sweets:

Esther Price

Ginniebug Creations

 

Committee Members

Teri Anderson – Chair

Mary Bane

Jan Culver

Claudia Dickey

Donna Durst

Connie Foster

Chris Holloway

Lori Igel

Mary Irby-Jones

Anne Kearney

Laura Koons

Ryan Leesman

Susan Page

Lezley Pisone

Ashley Robison

Susan Ruff

Craig Schrolucke

Toni Sprinkle

Tammy Thomas

Friends

Archer’s Tavern

Brooklyn Brewery

Dayton History-Carillon Park

Carillon Brewing Co.

Cathy Pearson

Coco’s Bistro

Dayton Performing Arts Alliance

Dorothy Lane Market

El Meson

Elements Massage-Beavercreek

Elizabeth Diamond Company

Enduring Youth Skin & Laser Center

Eric Matthew, Guitarist

Esther Price Candies

Fifth Street Brewpub

Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar

Connie Foster, Designworks Studio

Gervasi Vineyard

Ginniebug Creations

Greek Street Food Truck

Hanson Audio Video LLC

The Human Race Theatre Company

Lily’s Bistro

Leone Hinzman

Kathy Anderson, Owner, My Pilates Studio

Nestlé

Nibbles Restaurant & Catering – Watermark

Nicholas Yust

Peter Benjamin & Kate Callahan

The Pine Club

Poelking Lanes South

Rue Dumaine – Bar Dumaine

Rumbleseat Wine

Salar

Springhouse Architects

Stephanie Llacuna, Harpist

Sysco

The Woodhouse Day Spa

Today’s Home Interiors

Victoria Theatre Association

Warped Wing Brewing Co.

Watson’s of Dayton

Wellington Grille

Winans Chocolates & Coffees

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Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton Holds Special Place in the Heart of this High School Student

Madison Dox paints pottery in volunteer workroom on her 18th birthday.Madison Dox just celebrated her 18th birthday with the same friends and in the same location as the past three years. What’s unusual about that is the location is Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton. Madison brings her friends together on her birthday every year to share in a project of love and remembrance.

Madison parents divorced when she was young and her grandfather became the male role model in her life. The two were very close. Madison watched her grandfather’s struggle with cancer over four and half years She was present with him when he passed away at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton. It was the first major loss of her life.

That was during her freshman year in high school. On every birthday since, Madison brings her friends together to celebrate her birthday and remember her grandfather by creating gifts and crafts for the patients and families served by Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton. Madison also volunteers in other hospice roles and highlighted her hospice experience in her college application essay, explaining how her hospice experience touched her life.

“The goal of the Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton is to help heal those mourning during and after tough times,” she wrote. “Their assistance guides families from the darkness of grief towards the light of closure and peace. The serene atmosphere at Hospice eased my insecurities and calmed my fears of the uncertainty of my grandfather’s condition; but, most significantly, the compassionate staff reassured me that I would overcome the heartache of the indescribable loss, while enlightening me to ways I could spread my grandfather’s legacy to others.”

Madison came back to the Hospice House and brought her friends three months later with a goal of comforting others in need. “I am a committed volunteer whose sole purpose Is to provide comfort and peace to those grieving as I so gratefully received during my darkest times.” Whether decorating seedling pots for families, holiday decorations or handing out Teddy Bears to patients, Madison seeks “to bright light to others.” Her generosity is a living tribute to her grandfather’s memory, and a deeply moving and appreciated gift to others traveling the pathway of loss.

Friend joining Madison Dox on her 18th Birthday painting pottery in honor of Madison's grandfather.

Friend joining Madison Dox on her 18th Birthday painting pottery in honor of Madison's grandfather.

Friend joining Madison Dox on her 18th Birthday painting pottery in honor of Madison's grandfather.

 

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Ways to Celebrate the Life of a Loved One this Holiday Season

Remembering loved ones through photographs.The holiday season can be challenging to those who are grieving the loss of someone close.   Holiday rituals and traditions are important symbols of security and family bonds. Because of this, holidays can be both a reminder of the loss of a loved one, as well as a reminder of special, pleasant memories shared with that person.

For those who are grieving, painful feelings during the holidays are normal. Rather than place unrealistic expectations on themselves to do things the way they always have, grievers should lower expectations for themselves. While it may feel insincere if you try to force feelings of happiness and joy, do allow yourself to have fun. Loss teaches us more than anything about the preciousness of life and not to take it for granted.

We can also allow the holidays to be opportunities for memory, legacy, honor, connection, and healing. Expressing feelings and revisiting memories can be part of the healing process. Some suggestions for honoring lost loved ones might include:

  • Draw pictures or make cards of favorite holiday memories with the deceased.
  • Create a special ornament to hang on the tree or doorway.
  • Write a holiday letter to the deceased and place it in a special place either wrapped as a present under the tree or tied with a bow and placed next to their picture.
  • Place a picture of the deceased at the dinner table with a candle so they are part of the holiday feast.
  • Cook a favorite dish or dessert the deceased especially enjoyed.
  • Honor your loved one by making a toast, creating a memory area in your home, or hanging a holiday stocking filled with notes of special memories.
  • Look at photo albums and share memories.
  • Donate to a special charity in your loved one’s name.
  • Create a “gratitude bowl.” Family members can write holiday memories for which they will always be thankful about their loved one on colorful slips of paper. Share them out loud during a special time during the holidays.

These activities are powerful and healing because they allow mourning while at the same time giving permission to enjoy the holidays.

If you or someone you know could benefit from grief counseling from our professionals, please contact our bereavement center Pathways of Hope at 937.258.4991.

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Three Ways to Support Our Mission on #GivingTuesday

 

 

 

Support our mission for #GivingTuesday in more ways than one! Here’s 3 ways you can help:

 

Donating online

1.) Donate Online

Through community support, we are able to provide not-for-profit care regardless of our patients’ financial situations.
With a few simple clicks, you can help. Click here.

 

Heirlooms Holiday Room

2.) Shop/Visit/Donate to Heirlooms Shoppes™

The Heirlooms Shoppes™ of Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton provide gently used items at reasonable prices.  All proceeds benefit patient care and services. Shop our stores or visit our locations to drop off your items. Find our locations here.

 

Volunteer gardens on Ohio's Hospice of Dayton campus.

3.) Volunteer

As a Volunteer, you can visit patients to provide comfort, make crafts for patients and families, and much more! Support our community-based not-for-profit hospice as a volunteer here.

We are so #grateful for your kindness and generosity. Thank you for supporting your community-based not-for-profit hospice.

 

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The Best End-of-Life Care May Not Cost a Penny

hodThanks to community support, the best end-of-life care may not cost a penny.

Not-for-profit hospices like us devote donor dollars to assure that anyone who needs end-of-life care can receive it regardless of ability to pay. In addition to superior clinical services and care, we focus on:

  • Strong support for our patients and families including complementary therapies like massage, art, and music therapy, and grief counseling
  • Resources, education and support for all of the physicians, nurses and dedicated teams that serve our patients and families each and every day
  • Doctors who specialize in end-of-life care, and therapists and clergy who are there for our patients and families

Donor dollars make a difference every day in the lives of our patients and families. Any gift to your local Ohio’s Hospice affiliate stays in the community and helps sustain our mission and secure superior care and superior services at the end-of-life for your neighbors, family and friends.

We are grateful to you for enabling us to celebrate life with patients and families. Support our patients and families by clicking here.

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Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton Joins In Honoring Veterans

comm-care-vet-pinHospice of Dayton, Hospice of Miami County and Community Care Hospice – all affiliates of Ohio’s Hospice – joined together to honor Clinton County Veterans participating in a recent Honor Flight visit to Washington D.C. Almost 80 Veterans and their guardians took part in the Honor Flight experience, which included a tribute and send off at the Clinton County Courthouse.

The flight was sponsored by the Rotary Club of Wilmington, which raised money to send the Veterans and their guardians on the Honor Flight trip to see war memorials in the nation’s capitol. The community-based hospice organizations recognized participating Veterans with an American Pride pinning ceremony prior to their departure, making sure that each Veteran received an American Pride pin and was thanked for his/her service. The effort was a community extension of the American Pride program of each of the hospices. American Pride assures that Veterans in hospice care receive benefits and support that acknowledge their services and sacrifice. By recognizing the unique needs of our nation’s Veterans who are facing a life-limiting illnesses, these local not-for-profit hospice providers are able to accompany and guide Veterans and their families towards a more peaceful ending.

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8 Tips for Keeping Connected to Those with Dementia

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Loved ones with dementia or Alzheimer’s benefit from interaction with others. Sometimes we may not know how to best communicate with those experiencing memory problems, which occurs with every form of dementia. Here are some tips for interacting with people with dementia:

  • Conversation with people with dementia will vary dependent on where they are; early stage versus late stage. A key issue with dementia is loss of the ability to plan, reason, and execute a plan. Thus if you ask a yes or no question and it requires reasoning, often the answer will be no, not because they are saying no, but because they cannot decide.
  • Keep conversations simple and stay away from questions except as it pertains to real time: Are you hungry, thirsty, or in pain? Keep each question as a single subject and then wait for an answer. Do not change the question, but if not answered, ask exactly the same question again.
  • Stay away from “do you remember?” In dementia, early on, people do know their memories are worsening, so asking this may increase their frustration.   When looking at pictures, ask what the person thinks is happening in the picture rather than asking them to try to identify the person. This taps into imagination and decreases the stress of trying to remember.
  • Try to keep the environment calm and free of lots of stimulation. When wanting to communicate, turn off the TV and help the person focus to the conversation. Over stimulated persons with dementia may become agitated, aggressive or withdraw.
  • As dementia worsens, the person’s world will get smaller. They often end up in a single room due to inability to cope with the wider environment. This tells you that more stimulation is not what is needed, but that there is an increase in fear due to unrecognized surroundings.
  • Do not yell, shame, or corner a person with dementia. They are adults and often that is known to them. Also, do not use reality orientation. If you ask them how old they are, they may give you a clue as to what period of time they think they are in. It is easier to go to their reality than to drag them into our reality.
  • If they have forgotten who you are, be who they think you are, or introduce yourself at every visit and who you are. If they have forgotten you, do not take it personally. They just cannot remember.
  • Engage the senses as dementia frequently affects left brain function first. Sensory experiences are in the right brain. Aromatherapy, massage, music, quiet environments, lower lights help.

About the Author:

Nancy Sterling Trimble, PhD, RN, CNP is a geriatric Adult Nurse with over 30 years of experience. She has served as a faculty member of Indiana Wesleyan University, Capitol University and Wright State University. Nancy has also contributed numerous articles to clinical publications.

nancytrimble

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7 Questions to Ask When Choosing a Hospice

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Someday you or someone you love is likely to need hospice care. Before you arrive at that day as a crisis, it’s a good idea to consider what is important in choosing who will provide your hospice care. You do have choices, and your choice is a critical factor in what services you receive. It affects not only services provided to the patient, but to those left behind. Below are important questions to ask when deciding who will provide your hospice care:

1. How long has the hospice been in operation?

According to a major consumer publication, hospices with over 20 years of service demonstrate stability and reliability of service.

2. Is the hospice Medicare-certified?

If the patient is a Medicare beneficiary and wants to use the hospice benefit, Medicare certification is required to enable costs to be covered.

3. Is the hospice accredited and state-licensed?

Hospices with Accreditation (JCAHO or CHAP) have been reviewed by an impartial organization and accreditation indicates they are recommended as having good standards of care.

4. Is the hospice a not-for-profit?

Not-for profit hospices offer patient services and support that are not required by Medicare, but are highly valuable to patient care and comfort. Because not-for-profit hospices are first committed to the hospice mission, not to shareholder profit, not-for-profit providers typically spend substantially more on patient care.  Not-for-profit hospices are more likely to permit patients to continue with radiation and/or chemotherapy for cancer. If a patient wants to continue to receive these therapies to reduce the size of a tumor and reduce pain, it’s important to know whether the hospice permits such therapies.

Not-for-profit hospices also are more likely to provide an array of comfort therapies such as massage, music, art, pet assisted therapies and other non-pharmaceutical interventions that can significantly improve patient quality of life. These alternative, holistic treatments are important as you consider how well  a hospice will meet patient needs.

5. Is inpatient hospice care available?

Patients receiving care in their own home may develop complicated symptoms and need to have inpatient care to control symptoms or pain. Caring for someone with a serious illness can be exhausting for caregivers, who sometimes fall ill themselves. Some hospices offer “respite” care, enabling the patient to be cared for in an inpatient environment to allow the caregiver a break of up to 5 days. Not every hospice can meet the need for inpatient care. It’s an important option for the comfort of the patient and the caregiver.

6. Are the doctors and nurses certified in palliative care?

Specialized study in palliative and hospice care is a demonstration of expertise in addressing the needs of hospice patients.

7. Does the hospice offer grief support services?

Grief support services are available at no cost from some hospices, and continue for up to a year following the loss of a loved one. An array of services tailored to address the needs of various family members is a good indication of strong bereavement support for family members left behind.

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