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Archive | April, 2015

Education Series Helps Caregivers of those with Alzheimer’s Disease

Dr. BharwaniMany families try to deal with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia care challenges while keeping loved ones at home.  Wright State University, Hospice of Dayton and the Greater Dayton Mental Health Foundation are teaming up to offer a series of educational programs focused on practical techniques for home caregivers to improve quality of care for people with dementia, as well as reduce the stress on caregivers.  The program is tailored to the needs of caregivers and there is no cost and no clinical credit attached.

The series offers monthly presentations led by Dr. Govind Bharwani, Co-Director of Ergonomics and Alzheimer’s Care at Wright State University (WSU) in Dayton, OH.  Dr. Bharwani earned his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from WSU and has consulted for more than 100 organizations in the application of ergonomics and Alzheimer’s care.  Dr. Bharwani has effectively applied the science of ergonomics and neuroscience research to improve the quality of life for people with Alzheimer’s in long-term care facilities across the nation.  His innovative program called Behavior-Based Ergonomics Therapy (BBET) has received six national awards.  Dr. Bharwani received the 2012 Leaders of Tomorrow Award from Long-Term Living magazine and the 2014 Public Service Award from the American College of Health Care Administrators (ACHCA).

Each session addresses specific topics related to Alzheimer’s disease.  For the schedule of presentations click here.

Registration Information

Advance registration is required for each individual session.

Registration is available by calling 937-256-9507, ext. 2237 or by visiting the website www.hospiceofdayton.org/Alzheimers.

Hospice of Dayton Joins in Observance of National Healthcare Decisions Day April 16

Hospice of Dayton, along with other national, state and community organizations, is involved in leading a massive effort to highlight the importance of advance healthcare decision-making—an effort that has culminated in the formal designation of April 16 as National Healthcare Decisions Day (NHDD). As a participating organization, Hospice of Dayton is providing information and tools for the public to talk about their wishes with family, friends and healthcare providers, and execute written advance directives (healthcare power of attorney and living will) in accordance with Ohio state laws.

“We want to be able to honor patient wishes when the time comes to do so,” says Dr. Ruth Thomson, Chief Medical Officer at Hospice of Dayton.  “We want to encourage many more people in our community to have thoughtful conversations about their healthcare decisions and complete reliable advance directives to make their wishes known.”

The state of Ohio has recently updated advance directive forms, and Hospice of Dayton offers the new documents for download by clicking here.  The forms can be easily printed and completed to help guide healthcare providers in addressing your individual preferences for care.

“Pledge to yourself — and just as importantly your family — that by the time National Healthcare Decisions Day ends, you will have taken steps to make sure your wishes are clear to your family or the person you choose to make decisions for you if you can’t make them for yourself,” Dr. Thomson suggests.  “It is a gift of peace of mind that only you can give to your loved ones.”

New Chapel Full of Serenity and Symbolism

A dedication service for the newly renovated Chapel space at Hospice of Dayton was held on Friday, April 3, 2015.  The original Chapel was part of the Colp Building addition and opened in 1990.

The designer of the new Chapel, Beth Striebel, along with Architect, Paul Striebel, and Franklin Art Glass, paid homage to Biblical symbolism throughout their beautiful design.  The serene water fountain symbolizes baptism and renewal, while the stone wall mimics the look of the “Wailing Wall” for prayer in Jerusalem.

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Beth Striebel explains the inspirational symbolism evident throughout her design:

 “The stained glass panels convey a sense of tranquility, stirs the imagination, and presents an image of God’s outreach of His love.  The flowing design brings together the separated panels of glass and encloses the space of the Chapel the same way a prayer shawl, Tallith, ‘Little Tent’, provides enclosure to us, while in prayer. The lines in this piece represent the fringes of thread, Zizith, ‘Tassels’, found at the four corners of the prayer shawl, Tallith, ‘Little Tent’. The Tallith is symbolic of God’s love and provisions for His people, as is said in Psalm 61:4 (‘Let me dwell in Your tent forever!; Let me take refuge under the shelter of Your wings’)…The stained glass depicts a sweet sense of our loving Father’s care at a time when life seems so fragile, and encourages all that allow their imagination to receive, what their heart can feel.”

Welcomed with the soft guitar and vocals of Chaplain Mollie Magee, dedication service attendees joined in a Litany of Thanksgiving for the Chapel, along with a blessing, and the Hospice Prayer. We are thankful for this new Chapel for our patients, family members, and staff to enjoy this space for peaceful prayer and reflection.

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