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April Event Satisfies Appetites and Supports Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton Mission

Celebrating life is part of Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton’s mission, and celebrating Steins, Stems, Savories and Sweets is on the calendar this April, an event sure to please the palates of Dayton area “foodies.” Dayton area culinary connoisseurs can put their taste to the test as Steins, Stems, Savories and Sweets brings together the best flavors of Dayton on one great night at one great location.

“This event is so special because it enables us to lift up and highlight the creative chefs of wonderful local restaurants and the craftsmanship of local breweries, wine shops, bakeries and chocolatiers,” says event chair Teri Anderson. “Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton emphasizes celebrating life every day, and we are excited to feature businesses in our community that help us celebrate those important milestones in our lives.”

Scheduled for Saturday, April 29 at 7pm, at Carillon Historical Park, 1000 Carillon Blvd., in Dayton, the evening promises a passionate food experience for the culinary conscious. Top chefs from locally-owned eateries including Arche
r’s Tavern, Coco’s Bistro, El Meson, Bar Dumaine – Rue Dumaine, Lily’s Bistro, Nibbles – Watermark, Salar and the Greek Street Food Truck will serve scrumptious samples of their best work. Rumbleseat will select and pair wine with food selections; Sweets by Esther Price and Ginniebug Creations. Local breweries offering locally crafted beer include Fifth Street Brewpub, Warped Wing Brewing Company and Carillon Brewing Company.

Sponsors for the event include Synergy Building Systems, Dayton Physicians Network, Jerry and Patty Tatar, McGohan Brabender – Tony Lombardo, Coolidge Wall Co., LPA, Kent and Teri Anderson and Today’s Home Interiors.

Chef Anne Kearney from Rue Dumaine and Bar Dumaine says she was inspired to participate in the benefit for Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton because of the services the local not-for-profit organization provides families as well as patients. “Finding comfort for you and your loved ones during the struggle that often leads us to heaven’s gates is an essential part of survival for those left behind,” she says. “Consoling each of their pain lifts concern and allows for each to find closure.”

Those already salivating at the prospect of attending should purchase tickets now at www.HospiceofDayton.org/SSSS or by calling 937.258.5537. Tickets are limited. Tickets cost $90 each, with $70 of that total tax deductible as proceeds benefit patient care and services at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton. Dollars raised will

  • Provide superior care and superior services to anyone in our community facing end-of-life, regardless of ability to pay.
  • Provide grief support at no cost to anyone in the community.
  • Provide complementary services such as respiratory care, massage, music and art therapy.
  • Provide palliative care to patients whose chronic disease compromises their quality of life.

Steins, Stems, Savories & Sweets

April 29, 2017, 7pm

at Carillon Historical Park, 1000 Carillon Blvd., Dayton, Ohio

Ticket Price $90

Ticket Information – www.hospiceofdayton.org/ssss or 937.258.5537

Complimentary Valet Parking Available

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July Training Slated for New Volunteers at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton

Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton will hold a new volunteer orientation on July 12, 2017.

Hospice volunteers play a vital role with the interdisciplinary teams serving hospice patients and their families, providing a variety of services including respite care, shopping, delivery of medications and supplies, massage, beautician and barber services and gardening. Volunteers also serve as ambassadors sharing information about hospice care, as friendly visitors and in office support roles. Volunteer training acquaints new volunteers with information on

  • History and goals of end-of-life care
  • Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton history
  • Role of Volunteers and opportunities
  • Confidentiality, infection control, and safety
  • Boundaries
  • Effective listening
  • Loss and grief

Maureen Swarts, Volunteer Services Manager, welcomes volunteers from all backgrounds and of all ages. “Volunteers give from their hearts and enable us to touch the lives of patients and families with enhanced compassion and care. They are essential to our mission of providing superior care and superior services.”

For additional information please click here.

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Honoring Personal Care Specialists During Nursing Assistant’s Week

During Nursing Assistant’s Week, we honor our Personal Care Specialists who are central to our superior care and superior services.

Mary Murphy, President and Chief Nursing Officer of the Southwest Care Region of Ohio’s Hospice explains that Ohio’s Hospice changed the title of the Nursing Assistant to Personal Care Specialists because of the critical role they play in ensuring the best quality of life for our patients. “They provide the essential daily, hands-on care in homes, nursing homes and inpatient settings,” says Murphy. “As professionals the Personal Care Specialists are instrumental in promoting and safeguarding the physical, mental, emotional, social and spiritual well-being of the patients and their families. They are indeed specialists, attentive to patient changes and needs that enable every member of the clinical team to be more effective and responsive. Their contributions form the foundation of our quality care.”

In honoring them, Murphy said “Our Personal Care Specialists are trained professionals, who collaborate closely with other health care providers to deliver superior care and services and elevate the status of their profession.”

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Survivors Help Assure Superior Care and Superior Services

 

 

Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton is seeking insights into quality care from a unique perspective – from surviving family members of patients served.

A Family Advisory Committee comprised of family members who have lost loved ones in hospice care convenes monthly to consider processes, programs and provide feedback on ways the community-based, not-for-profit hospice can best serve patients and families.

Becky Graham lost her husband three years ago. She is grateful to be involved in the Advisory Committee and hopes her suggestions will help other families who use hospice services when a loved one is diagnosed with a life-limiting illness.

After both of his parents received hospice care at home in the past two years, James Webster felt he had the experience to offer valuable insights into the services and support provided.

Kathy Smith’s father received hospice care in an assisted living environment, while her aunt and mother were cared for in the home. She is appreciative that Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton rectified some issues she experienced with care. She believes her participation will help assure superior care and superior services for other families.

Norma Colussi’s mother was a nursing home resident when she became a hospice patient last year, and Paul Tudor’s wife received home care before she died a year ago. Both Norma and Paul embraced the opportunity to serve with the Advisory Committee as an opportunity to help hospice achieve ever-higher standards of care.

Patient Experience Advocate Jessica Conger says the Committee reflects a good cross-section of those who have experience with hospice care. ‘They come from different communities. Their loved ones received care in different environments. What they have in common is a loss experience that deeply impacted their lives and a desire to ensure high quality hospice care is available to others,” says Conger. “Every month we share information with them and receive feedback about educational and informational materials, communications processes, complementary therapies and other topics. The insights they offer help us refine and improve the materials we develop, our options for care and interactions with families. “

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State Officials Visit American Pride Veteran Memorial on Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton Campus

Representatives of Governor John Kasich’s office recently visited the American Pride Veteran Memorial at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton.  Sandra Brasington, Western Ohio Regional Liaison to Governor Kasich,  was joined by Chip Tansill, Director, Ohio Department of Veterans Services and Daniel Semsel, Regional Veteran Workforce Consultant, in a tour of the Memorial and discussion of American Pride services for Veterans at Ohio’s Hospice organizations. This marked the first official visit by state officials to the Memorial.

The American Pride Memorial is a moving commemoration that includes illustrated panels dedicated to American military campaigns ranging from the Revolutionary War to the War Against Terror. Each branch of the service is represented with a flag, and the American flag flies proudly at the center of the display. The memorial also includes a computer kiosk that features pictures and stories about veterans.

By visiting www.ohioshospice.org/american-pride, community members can enter their own stories or stories about loved ones, and upload photos of Veterans, honoring their lives and service. All stories submitted will be accessible online and on display at the American Pride Veteran Memorial. The stories are searchable by name. Any Veteran from the Greater Dayton area is eligible to be included.

 

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Carnation Kudos to Heather Brandenburg

Outstanding members of the Ohio’s Hospice staff are recognized every quarter with the Bouquet of Recognition Awards. Unit Coordinator Heather Brandenburg recently received the Carnation Award. 

Heather Brandenburg works at both Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton and Ohio’s Hospice of Butler & Warren Counties as a Unit Coordinator. Brandenburg was honored by a colleague for being an outstanding team player. Nominated by a co-worker who is grateful for all she does to support the hospice mission, Heather’s nomination cited just one example of her willingness to go above and beyond. “While Heather was doing her job as a Unit Coordinator, she took it upon herself to clean a housekeeping cart. She is very helpful and I really appreciate all that she does!”

We also appreciate Heather and her commitment to superior services and collaboration to assure superior care. Thanks Heather!

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Volunteer Orientation Slated at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton

Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton will hold a new volunteer orientation on July 12, 2017.

Hospice volunteers play a vital role with the interdisciplinary teams serving hospice patients and their families, providing a variety of services including respite care, shopping, delivery of medications and supplies, massage, beautician and barber services and gardening. Volunteers also serve as ambassadors sharing information about hospice care, as friendly visitors, pet assisted therapists and in office support roles

 

 

 


Volunteer training acquaints new volunteers with information on

  • History and goals of end-of-life care
  • Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton history
  • Role of Volunteers and opportunities
  • Confidentiality, infection control, and safety
  • Boundaries
  • Effective listening
  • Loss and grief

 

Maureen Swarts, Volunteer Services Manager, welcomes volunteers from all backgrounds and of all ages. “Volunteers give from their hearts and enable us to touch the lives of patients and families with enhanced compassion and care. They are essential to our mission of providing superior care and superior services.”

For additional information click here: www.hospiceofdayton.org/volunteers/

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“There Was No Book”

Her son says her strength is central to understanding Annie Smith’s character.   

“No matter what you do,” Lester Smith says, “when it comes to your parents, you never think you have done enough.”

 Lester has been relentless in making sure his mother gets what she needs.

 Annie was born in Georgia and moved to Dayton when she was a toddler. She and two sisters grew up in Dayton.

Lester said his mother’s health started slipping shortly after she retired from TRW Globe Motors where she worked in accounting for over forty years.  “She didn’t really get to enjoy her retirement,” Lester says. “She started having a variety of symptoms and we saw doctors all over Dayton and could not find out what was wrong.  Then we went to the Cleveland Clinic where they determined she had hydrocephalus.” No one knows what causes hydrocephalus, sometimes called “water on the brain.” Symptoms can be similar to Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and other illnesses. Once they had a diagnosis and began treatment, Lester said his mother improved.

Lester moved away from Dayton in 2007 and his mother relocated to New Orleans two years ago to live with her sister, Vanessa. Lester was able to visit his mom frequently in New Orleans, and over time became worried that she was declining. “I am so grateful to my Aunt. She gave of herself to allow me an opportunity to chase my dream. But there is no way my Aunt and I could provide all that my mother needed.  I could not let her die alone.”

When his mother was hospitalized in New Orleans, Lester heard the doctors say there was nothing more they could do, and it brought him to tears. That’s when he decided he had to get her back to Dayton. This was to be more of a challenge than he anticipated.

Caregivers in New Orleans felt his mother was not up to a trip of nearly over 12 hours and nearly 900 miles. But Lester insisted. “This is what my mother needs.”

Annie’s foresight made Lester’s decision easier. She had invested in long-term care insurance that enabled excellent options for her care. Lester found an ambulance service that could provide transportation. He learned of Grace Brethren Village through a friend from high school who works in healthcare. When he visited Grace Brethren he found the staff to be open and nice. He liked the fact it was small and felt it would be a good place for his mother. The ambulance trip was difficult, but his mom “was a trooper,” says Lester. He was so happy to get her home in December of 2016 just before Christmas.

With care at Grace Brethren and support from Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton, Annie’s condition has improved. He is grateful that her insurance enables her care to be covered, but is concerned about what happens if the insurance is exhausted. “It’s a real concern for anyone in this position,” Lester says.

Lester visits every day, sometimes not knowing what to say to his mother, not sure what she understands. He wishes for the times they used to share, remembering when they would travel together, “She loved the song HAPPY. I would play The Temptations for her and we’d both sing along.”

He has found a new community of friends among others who share the same responsibilities for loved ones whose health is failing. “All of my friends are going through the same thing,” says Lester. “I try to support them because I know caregiving can be a lonely job.” He can share what he has learned about dementia and its symptoms, and what steps legally and financially can be taken to ensure the best care for someone you love.

“There was no book for me to learn this from,” Lester says. “If my journey can be of help to others I am happy to share it.”

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Chaplain Tom Myers Earns Tulip Award

Outstanding members of the Ohio’s Hospice staff are recognized every quarter with the Bouquet of Recognition Awards. Chaplain Tom Myers is one of our newest recipients of the Tulip Award.

Tom Myers was presented with the Tulip Award. His nomination noted that Tom deserves this award for many reasons, but cites one in particular. “Recently, we had a patient who expressed spiritual concern to her Care Manager. She confessed feeling she was not worthy of God’s love. Tom visited with her several times but the patient remained spiritually distraught. Over time it was discovered that the patient had been baptized, but never “fully immersed”, which was extremely important to her. The Care Manager collaborated with Chaplain Tom who offered to re-baptize the patient. Because the facility where the patient resided was unable to accommodate a full-immersion experience, it was decided that they would use the local YMCA to provide a full immersion baptism for this patient. Everything was arranged and Tom was able to baptize this patient with full immersion. He not only baptized her, but brought himself an extra set of clothes and got into the pool with her in order to provide the baptism that she desired. Following her full immersion baptism, the patient was truly elated with a huge smile. Thereafter she declined quickly but remained mentally and spiritually at ease. Her family was very grateful to Tom for the extraordinary gift he gave her.”

Thank you, Tom,  not only for the gift that you gave this patient and her family, but everything that you do each day!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tulip Award Presented to Dionne Kapp

Outstanding members of the Ohio’s Hospice staff are recognized every quarter with the Bouquet of Recognition Awards. Dionne Kapp is one of our newest recipients of the Tulip Award.

Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton Social Worker Dionne Kapp was praised as consistently attentive to the needs of patients and families, but her nomination highlighted two situations in which she had gone above and beyond to assure superior care and services. The first involved a physically compromised nursing home patient and an her elderly spouse. The husband wanted badly for the wife to receive care in their home. When she discovered on a Monday morning that the patient planned to go home on Thursday without any well thought out plan in place, Dionne took action to assure this “deep seated wish of both patient and spouse” came to fruition. “Knowing that they had no family support,” shared her teammate in nominating Dionne, “she rose to the occasion and worked diligently to make this happen for them. Within ten days of her returning home, this patient died as she wished, cared for by her husband and our Coming Home/Crisis Care staff.” Dionne also worked tirelessly to assure that another patient, a veteran Marine, was able to participate in the Honor Flight to Washington, D.C.  “Dionne researched the criteria for the Honor Flight, repeatedly contacted their staff, filled out the paperwork, negotiated for his Flight Guardian to be the CNP from St. Leonard’s, spoke extensively with the POA encouraging him to return the required paperwork, sent documentation from the physician and has generally been the coordinator extraordinaire for this whole endeavor,” according to the nomination. “I am proud to call her Teammate.”

We are grateful for Dionne’s commitment to our hospice mission.

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Volunteers Shape Our Gardens at Hospice House

Every connection we make with our patients, families, and community is meaningful to us. We are always grateful when we learn that our organization holds special meaning to members of the community. That’s why we are so moved when Mark Bisceglia says his connection with Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton is what brought his Dayton Nielsen team of volunteers to our campus.

Mark Bisceglia, pictured, led the Dayton Nielsen team to Volunteer at the Ohio's Hospice of Dayton gardens.

Mark Bisceglia, pictured, led the Dayton Nielsen team to volunteer at the Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton gardens.

“Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton has had a very personal and profound impact on my life and the lives of my family,” Bisceglia said. “My father was a patient here almost 21 years ago and my mother-in-law was a patient recently around Easter. I’ve also had grandparents that utilized Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton’s services.”

Nielsen Volunteers uproot a bush at Ohio's Hospice of Dayton.

Nielsen Volunteers uproot a bush at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton.

When Bisceglia was placed in charge of this year’s Nielsen Global Impact Day for his Dayton team, Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton was the first organization he thought of.

“The campus and its staff have been there repeatedly during my time of need and this was an opportunity to give back to an organization that has provided so much for my family,” Bisceglia said.

Nielsen allows its over 40,000 team members to dedicate up to 24 hours of time per year to not-for-profit organizations. Once a year, Nielsen conducts its Nielsen Global Impact Day, a day the entire company, in the U.S. and throughout the world, volunteer at not-for-profit organizations.

Nielsen Volunteer adds these vibrant flowers to our Hospice House gardens.

Nielsen Volunteer adds these vibrant flowers to our Hospice House gardens.

This year, 12 Nielsen Volunteers gave over 40 hours of Volunteer time to Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton on that day alone. During that time, Bisceglia and his team focused on beautification of the Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton campus, by planting flowers, replacing flower beds, and planting grass seed.

Volunteer plants plant at Ohio's Hospice of Dayton Hospice House

“I would strongly encourage anyone with a heart of giving back to consider Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton,” Bisceglia said. “The services they provide and the incredible compassion of each and every staff member, in my opinion, makes this an ideal organization of which to serve.”

We thank the Nielsen team for supporting our mission of providing superior care and superior services to each patient and family – we can’t do what we do without our compassionate Volunteers.Nielsen Volunteers at Ohio's Hospice of Dayton Hospice House

Volunteers can support our mission in many ways. See how you or your workplace can make a difference in the lives of our patients and families by visiting this link.

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